SMART 3D SPECTACLES: WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY THAT ALLOW AND ASSIST VISUALLY IMPAIRED PEOPLE TO SEE

An invention of Dr. Stephen Hicks, a Neuroscientist from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. Dr. Hicks’s invention was widely known as SMART GLASSES. The Smart 3D Spectacles has a built in camera that technically picks up the three-dimensionality of the enhanced objects nearby, thus, can be tuned to a bright easy-to-see display and as well as can be put up or rather can be seen from the inside of that particular pair of spectacles. Practically, people can see an extra layer of vision when being worn. It adheres or rather give support and context to that specific environment. It is a significant way to help and assist vision of the people with severe sight impairments. A citation from www.thedailyguardian.com, that according to research, 90% of people who are registered blind have some existing light perception. The glasses use 3D cameras to greatly enhance what little they can already see through a computer and this is projected on to lenses. The result is that close-up objects and people go from being dark, indefinable blobs to outlined, cartoonised images. It was also mentioned that The glasses began life two years ago as chunky goggles with banks of computer screens. A £500,000 grant from the Google Impact Challenge, which supports charities using technology to aid people, is funding the development of a wearable slimmed-down pair of glasses and software that is usable on a mobile phone. In 2015, 1,000 volunteers tested the new version at home. If all goes to plan, a spin-off company owned by Oxford University and device creator, Stephen Hicks, could be selling them by 2016, priced at £300-£400. The potential to transform lives is huge with 30 million blind people worldwide. Though, this invention is likely to and possibly to be produced in the Philippines since we already have similar inventions from EPSON called The Moverio, thus, this device has also a front-facing camera that enables image and video capture as well as marker detection for AR apps that give users relevant information related to the real-world and as well as the “Wear-ever” device by the Smart Communication Network. The network’s spokesperson said “All this is part of the digital tsunami that we expect will sweep the world, including the Philippines in the coming years,” citing about their invention that could change the way people communicate. According to www.wfs.org, They combine a 3D camera and built-in software to enhance vision. The software enhances and highlights objects in the foreground while hiding the background. The wearer can even pause the visual feed and zoom in for greater detail. The depth camera works in the dark allowing for night. But The glasses don’t replace lost vision but assist with spatial awareness. Anyone using the glasses looks through them to make the most of their existing sight, with additional images appearing in their line of sight to give extra information about who or what is in front of them. (Photo below from Len Rosen’s 21st Century Tech Blog). VA-ST-software-e1434460715873 What is great about these glasses is that you can see through them and make the most of the vision you’ve got. They add to what you see with extra information. In some cases, details such as facial features can become easier to see – making social interaction more natural. The glasses work particularly well in low light and can be used to cope with night blindness. http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2014-06-17-smart-glasses-people-poor-vision-being-tested-oxford