Development Communication: towards Nation’s Progress

Development Communication was defined as the art and science of human communication linked to a society’s planned transformation from a state of poverty to one dynamic socio-economic growth that makes for greater equality and the larger unfolding of individual potentials by Dr. Nora C, Quebral, the mother of this discipline in 1971. Development Communication grew in response to societal problems. One of its underlying assumptions is that these (societal) problems may be traced to root causes and these root causes may in turn be remedied by information and communication. Development Communication is both an art and science of human communication because it uses scientific methods to make complicated things simple and as an art it uses different artistic, creative and eye catchy communication materials and media to communicate effectively. As a Development Communicator in the future, the author was able to draw out several realizations on how Development Communication was considered as an art and science of human communication.

YOU MUST BE CREATIVE. In persuading the community, you must implement the programs creatively. You, as the source of information must be able to transmit this information to your audience correctly and with their full attention to the topic, because if you don’t, you might find yourself alone.

Photo taken during the Community Organizing Class of BSDC 3A (batch 2014) at Brgy. San Roque, Nueva Valencia, Guimaras. Teaching these children the importance of proper hand-washing and personal hygiene.   Photo by: K.M. Vergara

Photo taken during the Community Organizing Class of BSDC 3A (batch 2014) at Brgy. San Roque, Nueva Valencia, Guimaras. Teaching these children the importance of proper hand-washing and personal hygiene.
Photo by: K.M. Vergara

YOU MUST BE RESOURCEFUL. This is making use of the available resources in the community. Give the fact that not all communities have the access to new technologies, you as a DevCom practitioner must be able to make out of something from the community, what’s with them and what they can do to it to make it useful, you must integrate different ideas to the community for as the old quote would say, teach them how to fish and they will live forever.

YOU MUST BE ABLE TO COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY. This is the main point of being a Development Communicator, communicating development to the people. You must be able to inform and educate people on the things of their concern and the things that they must learn whether they will be children, youth, those with profession, or even the adults.

Informal Education/ Spiritual Instructions to the children of Brgy. Mabini, Buenavista, Guimaras.
Photo by: R.P. Escala

YOU MUST BE ABLE TO SIMPLIFY THE COMPLICATED. This is one of the most needed attributes of a Development Communicator, and this is where the “science” takes place. Communicating new scientific innovations on farming for example is not easy, you have to learn it first, and then teach it to people on how use it in the simplest way possible in order for them to make use of it.

YOU MUST BE READY. Development Communication may lead you to somewhere far away from home. Let you step on a muddy road. Let you eat exotic food, therefore you must be ready emotionally, physically and mentally.

The discipline goes beyond profession, for development communication is a commitment and a life to live for the progress of the nation through information and communication. Development in the Third World Countries such as the Philippines is a dream and a goal that must be reached, for development starts from within, for Development Communication measures development through ‘man’.

Reference:

Ongkiko, Ila Virginia and Flor, Alexander G. (1998). Introduction to Development Communication. Los Baños: University of the Philippines Open University and Southeast Asia Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture.

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